David Foster Wallace on cleverness

David Foster Wallace: "You know, it's real interesting. I was a very difficult person to teach when I was a student and I thought I was smarter than my teachers and they told me a lot of things that I thought were retrograde or outdated or B.S. And I've learned more teaching in the last three years than I ever learned as a student. And a lot of it is that when you see students' work where the point, whether it's stated or not, is basically that they're clever, and to try and articulate to the student how empty and frustrating it is for a reader to invest their time and attention in something and to feel that the agenda is basically to show you that the writer is clever. All the kind of stuff, right, when I'm doing my little onanistic, clever stuff in grad school, that when my professors would talk to me about it, I would go, "Well, they don't understand. I'm a genius, blah, blah, blah, blah." Now that I'm the teacher, I'm starting to learn—it's like the older you get, the smarter your parents get—now I'm starting to learn that they had some smart stuff to tell me."

–Interview with David Foster Wallace by Leonard Lopate, WNYC, March 4, 1996.

Full interview here